Find the details of the latest HMNS research projects awarded funding:

The role of non-visual cues in regulating perception and skilled movement

Researchers

 

A/Prof Guy Wallis

Prof Stephan Riek

Prof Heinrich Buelthoff (Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics)

Funding Body

Australian Research Council Discovery Project

(ARC DP)

Years

2019–2022

Summary

This project aims to investigate the impact of non-visual sensory information on what we see and how we move. The project expects to improve our understanding of how information from our senses is combined, something which has implications for how well training in a sensorially impoverished virtual environment translates to the equivalent real-world task.

Expected outcomes include methods for specifying the optimal design of simulators intended to prepare trainees for a specific task.

This will benefit many areas of workforce training by improving the design and optimising the cost of simulator technologies across a wide range of medical, military and industrial applications at a time when their use is becoming evermore widespread.

Link

https://researchers.uq.edu.au/research-project/37006

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Understanding ecological sensibilities in recreational lifestyle sport

Researcher

 

Dr Rebecca Olive

Funding Body

Australian Research Council Discovery Early Career Research Award

(ARC DECRA)

Years

2019–2022

Summary

This research aims to understand environmental attitudes and behaviours that emerge through participation in recreational lifestyle sports. Linking the growth of lifestyle sports in Australia and the recent focus on oceans as

significant spaces of enquiry in humanities and social sciences research, it will highlight how surfers and ocean swimmers develop relationships to, and produce knowledge about, Australian oceans and coasts. It is interested

in everyday cultural practices relating to ethical consumption, including through social media, and will provide key insights for surfing and ocean swimming communities to enable them to make better choices about their attitudes and practices relating to sustainable oceans and coasts.

Link

https://researchers.uq.edu.au/research-project/37090

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Scaling, spreading, and sustaining The Systematised, Interdisciplinary Malnutrition Program for impLementation and Evaluation (SIMPLE) - a multi-site implementation program

Researcher

 

Dr Jack Bell

Funding Body

Medical Research Future Fund Translating Research Into Practice Fellowship (MRFF TRIP Fellowship)

Years

2019–2020

Summary

Malnutrition affects more than one-third of hospital inpatients with profound impact on patient and healthcare outcomes. Hospital dietitians

currently provide highly individualised malnutrition care to a select few; despite evidence demonstrating that implementing a systems-level

approach provides more equitable, effective, higher value care. Novel, multi-site implementation programs I have led in Australia and Canada

have established the rationale and process for shifting from highly individualised, low value inpatient malnutrition care to multidisciplinary,

multimodal nutrition care. These have been iteratively developed across three key action research cycles;

  1. multidisciplinary nutrition care in acute hip fracture (PhD project);
  2. the More-2-Eat program (Canada); and
  3. a Systematised, Interdisciplinary Malnutrition Program for impLementation and Evaluation (SIMPLE)(Queensland).

My highly innovative approach has integrated constructs from key implementation science / knowledge translation frameworks across phases. I have led mixed methods research conducted to build the reason to change. The complex implementation and evaluation plans I have led

(Australia) and co-led (Canada) have successfully engaged consumers and local teams to iteratively develop, test and adapt, and evaluate new

malnutrition tools and models of care that are adaptable to fit local environments.

These innovative algorithms have delivered significant improvements in nutritional, patient and healthcare outcomes in trial sites in Australia

and Canada. Changes in policies, treatment guidelines and audit datasets are also evident. Substantial research impact has been demonstrated and

ongoing research grant success demonstrates further appetite for scale and spread into routine practice.

SIMPLE has transformed how malnutrition care is delivered in test sites. My vision is to translate this success across Queensland hospitals to

deliver better malnutrition care to all who need it.

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Commercial Activity in Pacific Education

Researchers

 

Dr Anna Hogan

A/Professor Greg Thompson, Queensland University of Technology

Professor Bob Lingard, The University of Queensland and Australian Catholic University

Dr Mesake Dakuidreketi, University of the South Pacific

Funding Body

Education International

Year

2019

Summary

There has been a lot of academic research and literature on the privatisation of schooling, set against the effects of globalization following the end of the Cold War. Research has moved now to focus on commercialisation in schooling as an element of transition to a new phase of neo­ liberalism reflective of new state structures and relationships between the public and private spheres. The literature documents how commercialisation in schooling systems and schools in the GlobalSouth works largely in respect of low fee for profit private schools, while in the Global North, commercialisation and increased involvement of large private corporations has worked largely in relation to what Sahlberg (2011) has called the Global Education Reform Movement (GERM). This reform agenda is also starting to impact on Global South nations. These reforms are often accompanied by a restructuring of the education state. This is often typified by new accountability relationships between the state and schools, new employment conditions for teachers and principals and the adoption of education policies from other contexts. New accountability regimes are often set in place as relationships between departments of education and schools change with schools granted more autonomy to achieve centrally set targets. School autonomy sometimes includes one-line budgets and the hiring of teachers at the school level. Testing of numeracy and literacy has been a common accompaniment of these reforms with accountability framed in a top-down, test-based manner. League tables of school performance made public is also often part of this change scenario. These restructurings can potentially open up spaces for commercialisation and privatisation in and of schooling. Limited research has been conducted to date on the extent of such education reform in Global South nations. This study will collect baseline data to document and understand the extent of this restructuring in eight Pacific nations, that is, the extent to which GERM is being put into effect in the schooling systems of the Pacific nations of Cook Islands, Fiji, Kiribati, Samoa, Solomon Islands, Tonga, Tuvalu, and Vanuatu.

The study will purposively sample participants from education ministries, education union officials and school principals and teachers in each nation.

Link

https://researchers.uq.edu.au/research-project/37603

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Active Choices: A 'stepped-down' program to promote group-based physical activity to DVA clients

Researchers

 

A/Prof Nicholas Gilson

Dr Gregore Iven Mielke

Professor Catherine Haslam (UQ Psychology)

Dr Jonas Fooken (UQ Centre for Business and Economics of Health)

Prof James McKenna, Leeds Beckett University

Professor Wendy Brown

Funding Body

Department of Veterans’ Affairs

Year

2019–2021

Summary

The rationale for this research is based on the observation that there has been significant growth in the provision of Allied Health Services for DVA clients, especially for services that relate to musculoskeletal outcomes.

The first aim of this research is therefore to critically review existing ‘Stepped Down’ models of care relating to PA, with a specific focus on service veterans and their dependents.

The second aim is to use data from the review, in combination with our existing resources for Physical Activity self-management, to establish and evaluate Active Choices, a best practice ‘Stepped Down’ PA intervention for DVA clients.

Link

https://researchers.uq.edu.au/research-project/37661

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