Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third most common cancer in the world and the number of cases is expected to increase by 60% in the next 15 years. Higher levels of physical activity have been associated with lower risk of CRC occurrence, recurrence and mortality, amongst other benefits including improved quality of life. Exercise, particularly higher intensity exercise, results in both short- (e.g. stress hormones, immune response) and long-term (e.g. insulin) changes in the blood that may influence the size and spread of tumours.

This study will advance understanding of the role of exercise intensity on cancer cell growth in vitro. It will also explore the role and contribution of biological mechanisms linking exercise intensity to the immune response and cancer cell growth in vitro. Understanding the role of exercise intensity in cancer cell growth will inform the development of optimal exercise ‘dose’ recommendations, and targeted exercise interventions for CRC survivors.

This research is a collaboration between researchers at the School of Human Movement and Nutrition Sciences, the Translational Research Institute, the QIMR Berghofer Medical Research Institute and the Karolinska Institutet, Sweden.

Project members

Project Members

The School of Human Movement and Nutrition Sciences researchers involved in this project are:

 

Dr Tina Skinner

Senior Lecturer
School of Human Movement and Nutrition Sciences

Associate Professor David Jenkins

Associate Professor
School of Human Movement and Nutrition Sciences