Balance, Resistance or Interval Training Trial (BRAIN) for people with Mild Cognitive Impairment

Description              

Mild cognitive impairment is a significant risk factor for dementia and impaired vascular function is associated with decreased cognition and the progression of dementia.  Exercise has been shown to be effective in mitigating and even improving vascular function and cognition, however the relationship between the two is still unknown.

Therefore, the aim of this study is to investigate the effects of resistance training, aerobic training or balance and mobility training on cardiovascular and cognitive outcomes in individuals with mild cognitive impairment.

Expected outcomes

The successful applicant will:

  • Participate in exercise training and testing of individuals with mild cognitive impairment.
  • Learn techniques such as cerebral blood flow and analysis, preparation of blood samples for storage, VO2max testing (ECG and Metamax systems), strength and power testing for older adults.
  • Assist with data analysis and data entry.

Suitable for                                            

This project is suitable for 2nd and 3rd year students that are interested in working with older adults.  Ideal for people that have good rapport building skills and are interested in cardiovascular and/or cognitive health.

Number of position available

2 scholarships available

Project Duration

8 weeks

Preferred Commencement Date

26-Nov-2018

Expected hours per week

36 hours

Supervisor/s

Professor Jeff Coombes

For more information about the project please contact Miss Emily Smith on emilyclaire.smith@uq.edu.au

 

How do past actions and rewards bias goal directed movement?

Description

It is often possible to perform the same physical task with movements that have very different characteristics. Current theories of sensorimotor control assume that the brain chooses from the abundance of possibilities by actively seeking the most accurate or economical way to move. By contrast, human movements tend to resemble previous actions, even if this results in inaccuracies or inefficiencies. This project uses innovative timing methods and brain recordings to test how the history of movements we have executed in the past, and the rewards associated with those movements, interact to affect subsequent movement execution. In so doing, the project should advance our basic understanding of how the human brain controls movement.

Expected outcomes

Scholars will gain skills in data collection, data analysis and visualisation, and will have the opportunity to contribute to the fundamental neurophysiology that underpins the control of human limb movements.

Suitable for

This project is open to UQ students with an interest in human neuroscience, who are motivated to develop skills in electrophysiology (e.g. EMG, EEG), non-invasive brain stimulation (e.g. TMS), and kinematic analyses. An aptitude for, or experience in using, custom computer software and electronic communication systems is desirable.

Number of position available

2 scholarships available

Project Duration

8 weeks

Expected hours per week

36 hours

Proposed Commencement

19-Nov-2018

Supervisor/s

A/Prof Timothy Carroll

Please contact A/Prof Carroll prior to submitting an application to discuss your suitability for the project. Email: timothy.carroll@uq.edu.au

 

How do past actions and rewards bias goal directed movement?

Description

It is often possible to perform the same physical task with movements that have very different characteristics. Current theories of sensorimotor control assume that the brain chooses from the abundance of possibilities by actively seeking the most accurate or economical way to move. However, human movements tend to resemble previous actions, even if this results in inaccuracies or inefficiencies. This project uses innovative timing methods and brain recordings to test how the history of movements we have executed in the past, and the rewards associated with those movements, interact to affect subsequent movement execution. In so doing, the project should advance our basic understanding of how the human brain controls movement.

Expected outcomes

The student will gain skills in data collection, especially using EEG, eye tracking and a robotic manipulandum to study motor control and motor learning. Students can further help pre-processing and analysing the data and are welcome to present findings in a lab meeting.

Number of position available

1 scholarship available

Project Duration

8 weeks

Expected hours per week

25 hours

Proposed Commencement

19-Nov-2018

Supervisor/s

Dr Eva-Maria Reuter

For further information, please contact Dr Eva-Maria Reuter at e.reuter@uq.edu.au

 

Peer support for the maintenance of high intensity interval training and health in cancer survivors

Description

Using peer-support to improve exercise adherence and the health of cancer survivors beyond the duration of a short-term supervised training program

Expected outcomes

Being a summer scholarship student within this project will present with a number of learning opportunities, including, but not limited to:

  • helping run supervised exercise sessions with people with cancer.
  • helping run supervised exercise testing sessions with people with cancer.
  • assisting with data collection and entry.
  • gaining experience with administration procedures within a randomized control trial study.

Suitable for

This project is suitable for any student who meets the following criteria:

Essential:

  • Willing and able to attend early morning testing and training sessions.
  • Excellent communication skills.
  • High level attention to detail

Desired:

  • Previous experience working with individuals with cancer
  • Previous experience working with older adults in an exercise setting
  • Students who have completed an exercise science technical skills subject (or equivalent)

Number of position available

2 scholarships available

Project Duration

10 weeks

Expected hours per week

36 hours

Proposed Commencement

19-Nov-2018

Supervisor/s

Dr Tina Skinner

For further information, please contact Tina Skinner at t.skinner@uq.edu.au

 

Sport, Stories and Survival: Examining Cherbourg’s Past and Present

Description

Background: Cherbourg was established in 1904 approximately 250 kilometres north-west of Brisbane, and is recognised as one of Queensland’s most famous (and infamous) Indigenous settlements. Sport has played an incredibly important role from the inception of Cherbourg until contemporary times and the Summer Program will make a significant contribution to examining the cultural, social, and political complexities of sport at Cherbourg. This analysis of sport will inform us about a little-known period of our history when Indigenous people were essentially excluded from mainstream Australia and when Aboriginal people gradually and incrementally engaged in sport to create a collective identity, to test themselves in Anglo-Australian competitions, and as a barometer of 20th-century race relations.

Aims: This project, via a focus on the sport of boxing, aims to:

  • Collaboratively work with the research team and Cherbourg community to ensure their voices are recorded/preserved
  • Research and collate written records to share with the community
  • Explore, share and record personal memories and meanings
  • Individually, contribute to the process of healing through history making
  • Collectively, contribute to reconciliation efforts through collective memory making and displays of these memories

Expected outcomes

The student intern will develop skills in historical research and benefit from participating in the project through exposure to the larger research context in which this project sits. More broadly, the student intern will gain an understanding of Aboriginal Australian culture, develop skills in engaging with Aboriginal people on their terms, and gain additional preparation for future interactions with Indigenous people during their professional lives after graduation.

Key tasks are to:

  • Conduct literature searches where appropriate
  • Assist with archival and library research
  • Contribute to database development
  • Organise oral history interviews with individuals, if appropriate, to share and record personal memories and meanings
  • Liaise with Aboriginal groups and memory institutions to make appropriate documents and materials available

Suitable for

UQ-enrolled students only. Ideally, but not necessarily, applicants should have taken at least one of the HMNS sociocultural courses (e.g., sport history, sport sociology) and be motivated to work with and learn alongside Indigenous cultures.

Number of position available

1 scholarship available

Project Duration

6-10 weeks, negotiable

Expected hours per week

20 hours

Proposed Commencement

19-Nov-2018

Supervisor/s

A/Prof Gary Osmond and A/Prof Murray Phillips

Potential applicants are encouraged to contact A/Prof Gary Osmond & A/Prof Murray Phillips: g.osmond@uq.edu.au; m.phillips@uq.edu.au

 

Muscle mechanics and energetics

Description

This project will involve collecting biomechanical and physiological data during locomotion activities (walking/running/cycling) and then using this data to inform predictions of energy consumption based on muscle mechanical requirement. The aim of the project is to help create better models that can predict energetics, so that we can better understand how changing movement might enhance human performance.

Expected outcomes

Participants will gain a range of skills in data collection and advance biomechanical analysis techniques. They will be required to collate data and present the data to members of the research centre at the end of the project. 

Suitable for

We are looking for dedicated students with a strong interest and aptitude for biomechanics and in particular for students with strong computer and analytical skills for undertaking advanced analysis.

Number of position available

1 scholarship available

Project Duration

10 weeks

Expected hours per week

36 hours

Proposed Commencement

19-Nov-2018

Supervisor/s

A/Prof Glen Lichtwark

The project is relatively broad and will be more refined in consultation with the successful student prior to the project starting. Students are welcome to contact A/Prof Glen Lichtwark if they have any queries: g.lichtwark@uq.edu.au

 

Programs addressing physical activity intensity and nutrition in authentic settings: A systematic review

Description

Healthy eating and physical activity participation in childhood are associated with a number of positive health benefits. Physical activity intensity and nutrition behaviours are two factors often examined in programs/interventions focused on health outcomes in paediatric populations. These factors are frequently manipulated and examined in laboratory-based studies, but it critical to also understand how they function and impact health outcomes in more authentic settings such as schools and after-school programs. Accordingly, the aim of this project is to conduct a systematic review of the literature examining the impact of physical activity intensity and nutrition behaviours on health outcomes in authentic settings.

Expected outcomes

The selected scholar will gain skills in conducting a systematic literature review, which involves searching different databases, screening articles for inclusion, extracting information from articles, and evaluating the quality of articles. The student may also have the opportunity to generate presentations for local or national conferences, or work towards a paper for publication with the supervisors.

Suitable for

This project would be suitable for 3rd and 4th year UQ enrolled students with a background and/or interest in nutrition and/or physical activity, and its application in paediatrics/school settings.

Number of position available

1 scholarship available

Project Duration

10 weeks

Expected hours per week

25-30 hours

Proposed Commencement

19-Nov-2018

Supervisor/s

Dr Michalis Stylianou and Dr Jacki Walker

Students interested in this project are encouraged to contact Dr Michalis Stylianou at m.stylianou@uq.edu.au or Dr Jacki Walker at j.walker3@uq.edu.au prior to submitting an application.

 

The Effect of Exercise on Functional, Biological and Quality of Life Outcomes in Multiple Myeloma

Description

The successful scholar will be involved across several studies exploring the effects of exercise on multiple myeloma, including questionnaires on

 Haematologists’ and patients perspectives on exercise in myeloma, the effects of exercise training on cancer-related fatigue, and the efficacy of a community based exercise program on health-related outcomes.

Expected outcomes

Being a summer scholarship student within this project will present with a number of learning opportunities, including, but not limited to:

  • assisting with data collection and entry.
  • gaining experience with administration procedures within a randomized control trial study.
  • helping run supervised exercise sessions with people with cancer.
  • helping run supervised exercise testing sessions with people with cancer.

Suitable for

This project is suitable for any student who meets the following criteria:

Essential:

  • High level attention to detail
  • Good communication skills

Desired:

  • Previous experience working with individuals with cancer
  • Previous experience working with older adults in an exercise setting

Number of position available

1-2 scholarships available

Project Duration

10 weeks

Expected hours per week

36 hours

Proposed Commencement

19-Nov-2018

Supervisor/s

Dr Tina Skinner

For further information, please contact Tina Skinner at t.skinner@uq.edu.au

 

Can Exercise Prevent Chemotherapy-Induced Neurotoxicity in Breast Cancer Patients?

Description

The successful scholar will be involved across all aspects of this randomised controlled trial exploring whether supervised exercise training can prevent the neurotoxic and cardiovascular damage from chemotherapy in women with breast cancer.

Expected outcomes

Being a summer scholarship student within this project will present with a number of learning opportunities, including, but not limited to:

  • assisting with data collection and entry.
  • gaining experience with administration procedures within a randomized control trial study.
  • helping run supervised exercise sessions with women with breast cancer.
  • helping run supervised exercise testing sessions with people with breast cancer.

Suitable for

This project is suitable for any student who meets the following criteria:

Essential:

  • High level attention to detail
  • Good communication skills

Desired:

  • Previous experience working with individuals with cancer
  • Previous experience working with older adults in an exercise setting

Number of position available

1-2 scholarships available

Project Duration

10 weeks

Expected hours per week

36 hours

Proposed Commencement

19-Nov-2018

Supervisor/s

Dr Tina Skinner

For further information, please contact Tina Skinner at t.skinner@uq.edu.au

 

The Combination of High-Intensity Interval Aerobic and Resistance Training Compared to Current Recommendations and its Influence on Glycaemic Control in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

Description

Traditional exercise programs recommended for the management of type 2 diabetes (T2D) is of long-duration at moderate intensity. This can be a problem since lack of time is often cited as a limitation to participating in exercise. Therefore, it would be beneficial to have an exercise program that can gain metabolic adaptations similar to exercise of longer durations, but be performed in a shorter time. High-intensity interval exercise training (HIIT), which consists of repeated bursts of high-intensity activity, separated by periods of recovery or activity of a relatively lower intensity, provides an excellent alternative option to traditional exercise of long-duration. Therefore, the aim of this study is to compare the effects of a novel combined aerobic and resistance HIIT protocol to the current exercise recommendations on glycaemic control, cardiorespiratory fitness, muscular strength, autonomic function, arterial stiffness, body composition and vascular function in people with T2D.

Expected outcomes

Successful applicants will have the opportunity to be involved in/run participant training sessions, as well as assist in the collection of physiological data including cardiorespiratory fitness, functional strength, bloods, body composition and arterial stiffness. There will also be opportunities to participate in trial organisation and data entry.

Suitable for

This project is open to applications from 3rd or 4th year students with a background in clinical exercise physiology and/or exercise and sports science.

Number of position available

1 scholarship available

Project Duration

8 weeks

Expected hours per week

20-25 hours

Proposed Commencement

19-Nov-2018

Supervisor/s

Prof Jeff Coombes

Please contact the project supervisor Prof Jeff Coombes (jcoombes@uq.edu.au) or PhD student Emily Cox (emily.cox@uq.net.au) for further information.

 

Enhancing language learning in ageing with exercise: An fMRI investigation

Description

Ageing is associated with cognitive changes such as memory decline, which influences the ability to learn new words. Acute exercise (one single session of exercise) is thought to influence cognition through a temporary increase in biomarker levels or through a generalized effect on arousal, however the neural correlates of exercise-induced new word learning have yet to be explored in healthy adults. The aim of this research project is to understand how exercising affects learning and to identify underlying brain activity by training people to learn new words in a functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) scanner immediately after they have exercised. This interdisciplinary research project combines the fields of language neuroscience, ageing and exercise physiology. This project will consist of recruiting 80 healthy adults aged 60-85 meeting specific eligibility criteria. Participants will be asked to attend three visits and will undergo a cognitive and fitness assessment, blood draws, a stretching or exercise session (of either moderate or high intensity), in scanner word learning tasks, and recall and recognition tasks. This research will provide information about whether exercise can improve learning, especially word learning, and identify which parts of the brain participate in this process. Different diseases and conditions can have a negative impact on the way people use language to communicate, due to changes in the structure or function of their brain. Understanding how exercise affects language learning and the regions of the brain that support this may lead to development of new approaches to improving language re-learning in people with these conditions (e.g., stroke, Parkinson’s disease, Alzheimer’s disease).

Expected outcomes

Successful applicants will have the opportunity to be involved in/run participant exercise sessions, as well as assist in fitness testing. There will also be opportunities to participate in recruitment, trial organisation and data entry.

Suitable for

This project is open to applications from 3rd or 4th year students with a background in clinical exercise physiology and/or exercise and sports science.

Number of position available

1 scholarship available

Project Duration

6 weeks

Expected hours per week

20 hours

Proposed Commencement

19-Nov-2018

Supervisor/s

Prof Jeff Coombes

Please contact the project supervisor Prof Jeff Coombes (jcoombes@uq.edu.au) or PhD student Marie-Pier McSween (m.mcsween@uq.edu.au) for further information.